Women Disobey | June 28, 2018

About 600 women were arrested during a mass civil disobedience to protest the Trump Administration's immigration and family separation at the border in Washington, DC. 

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National Student Walkout I March 14, 2018

Students around the DC area walk out of schools to protest gun violence and rally in the Nation's Capital. 

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 “I'm walking out today because as a woman, as a student, as a Latina, as a person of passion, I feel like it is my duty to be part of a movement which deeply affects people just like me. I'm the representative for Einstein local students for gun control and it was a collective effort of me and other applicants from other high schools to organize the whole county and then me and other organizers at my school specifically to organize our school.  We've been planning this for about three weeks now. It's been a headache, it's been super stressful, definitely sacrificing a lot—but it's all worth it in the end. I think the sacrifices of all the students, organizers, and representatives have made it so worth it for something that hits so deep.   There's definitely some pushback on social media. People will comment and say hurtful things, but honestly like we all understand what we're doing. We all understand how important it is to stay true to something that you are putting your heart into. So no matter what people say we're still going to do what we're going to do and be successful” -Sofia Hidalgo, student at Albert Einstein High School, age 15

“I'm walking out today because as a woman, as a student, as a Latina, as a person of passion, I feel like it is my duty to be part of a movement which deeply affects people just like me. I'm the representative for Einstein local students for gun control and it was a collective effort of me and other applicants from other high schools to organize the whole county and then me and other organizers at my school specifically to organize our school.

We've been planning this for about three weeks now. It's been a headache, it's been super stressful, definitely sacrificing a lot—but it's all worth it in the end. I think the sacrifices of all the students, organizers, and representatives have made it so worth it for something that hits so deep. 

There's definitely some pushback on social media. People will comment and say hurtful things, but honestly like we all understand what we're doing. We all understand how important it is to stay true to something that you are putting your heart into. So no matter what people say we're still going to do what we're going to do and be successful” -Sofia Hidalgo, student at Albert Einstein High School, age 15

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“It's been one month to the day since Parkland. Almost 20 years since Columbine. And the fact that there has been no legislation and no change is a major issue. The fact that there aren't people in power who have made a change is a problem and we're walking out to show that we care and that we're not going to stand for this and ultimately we're going to vote next, so we will vote those people out of office so we can actually have a good government that is protecting us.

Ultimately when we go to school, we go to school to learn and we should feel safe at school, no one should be feeling nervous to go to school. We're scared that someone is able to get a gun and shoot us — that should not be a fear teenagers have. 

I think it’s important that we voice our opinions and I think it's important that we show people that this is an issue and we're fighting for it.” - Ella Robertson, student of Albert Einstein High School, age 15

 Many students wore a piece of orange clothing for the protest. The color is based on the choice of the parents of Hadiya Pendleton, who was shot and killed in Chicago in 2013. Their organization to honor her describes it as: “Orange is what hunters wear in the woods to protect themselves and others from harm. Orange is a bright, bold color that demands to be seen. Orange expresses our collective hope as a nation — a hope for a future free from gun violence."

Many students wore a piece of orange clothing for the protest. The color is based on the choice of the parents of Hadiya Pendleton, who was shot and killed in Chicago in 2013. Their organization to honor her describes it as: “Orange is what hunters wear in the woods to protect themselves and others from harm. Orange is a bright, bold color that demands to be seen. Orange expresses our collective hope as a nation — a hope for a future free from gun violence."

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 “I'm walking out because I think it's important to show that we're not going away anytime soon. The first [walkout] was great, but we’ll just keep on having more. It's important to show that we're not silent after just one time, we're not going to go away. We're going to remain here.” - Amelia Ketelselger, age 15

“I'm walking out because I think it's important to show that we're not going away anytime soon. The first [walkout] was great, but we’ll just keep on having more. It's important to show that we're not silent after just one time, we're not going to go away. We're going to remain here.” - Amelia Ketelselger, age 15

 Senator Elizabeth Warren was among a few Democratic leaders who came out to greet students protesting outside of the Capitol Building. 

Senator Elizabeth Warren was among a few Democratic leaders who came out to greet students protesting outside of the Capitol Building. 

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